SPORTS INJURY AND MEDICINE

SPORTS INJURY PREVENTION

Can sports injuries be prevented? Many sports injuries can be prevented by learning about the sport and making sure your child has the necessary protection. Before signing your child up for a sport, you should consider: Cooler weather is safer. Some surfaces will reduce the impact on your child’s joints, reducing injuries. Sharing the road with automobiles can raise the risk of injury. Broken or unsafe helmets, pads, or shields can increase the risk of injury.

SPORTS AND CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS

All children can benefit from the exercise, energy release, and pure enjoyment of playing sports, and this includes children with special needs. About 18% of children in the U.S. have a disability or chronic condition. Special needs children are sometimes not encouraged to exercise because their parents or guardians fear they’ll be hurt. But physical activity is as important for special needs children, as it is for any child.

SAFETY AND INJURY PREVENTION FOR TEENS

Unintentional injury sends thousands of children and adolescents to the hospital seeking emergency medical care each day. With proper education, improvements to the environment, enforcement of certain safety legislation and regulations, and community involvement, many injuries can be prevented. In fact, most unintentional injuries can be prevented, especially as they relate to sports. Practicing safe play is the most important part of safety and injury prevention for teens.

SHIN SPLINTS

Shin splints refers to pain and tenderness along or just behind the large bone in the lower leg (the tibia). Shin splints, also called medial tibia stress syndrome, usually develop after rigorous exercise, sports, or repetitive activity. This repetitive activity can lead to inflammation of the muscles, tendons, and thin layer of tissue covering the bone (the periosteum) of the tibia, causing pain.

SPORTS SAFETY FOR TEENS

Participating in sports is great for teens both physically and psychologically. Sports can increase an adolescent’s physical coordination, fitness, and self-esteem. In addition, sports can teach teens about teamwork and self-discipline. However, because an adolescent’s body is still growing and his or her coordination is still developing, adolescents are more susceptible to sports injuries. Most childhood sports injuries occur due to the following factors: Lack of education, rough play, and lack of supervision.

SWIMMER’S EAR

Otitis externa, also called swimmer’s ear, is an inflammation, irritation, or infection of the external ear canal. Swimmer’s ear is caused by fungi or bacteria. Water that remains trapped in the ear canal (when swimming, for example) may provide a source for the growth of bacteria and fungi. Many different factors can increase your child’s chance of developing swimmer’s ear. As the name implies, one of the factors is excessive wetness.

SPORTS, HOT WEATHER CAN BE DANGEROUS COMBO

Summertime fun often includes outdoor sports, but playing hard in the heat can be dangerous, experts warn. Athletes are particularly vulnerable to problems that arise when the body’s ability to cool itself is overwhelmed. Following just a few simple heat safety rules can protect the health of athletes and prevent issues.