SKIN CONDITIONS (NON-CANCEROUS)

SKIN CONDITIONS

The skin is the largest organ of the body. As the outer protective covering of the body, it is exposed to the environment, making it vulnerable to growths, rashes, discolorations, cysts, burns, injuries, infections, and other disorders. Many common skin disorders require the clinical care of a physician or other health care professional. Common medical dermatology and skin conditions include acne, moles, rosacea, eczema, cancer, and rashes. 

FUNGAL INFECTIONS OF THE SKIN

Many types of fungal skin infections require clinical care by a physician or other health care professional. There are several types of fungi that can impact the skin. While anti-fungal creams are typically useful for some common fungi, more severe cases should be seen by a health care professional. If you are experiencing a fungal infection of the skin, make an appointment with your dermatologist or general physician.

HIV/AIDS AND SKIN CONDITIONS

Skin conditions are common in people with HIV/AIDS. Many, including Kaposi sarcoma, thrush, and herpes. These are caused by germs that take advantage of a weakened immune system. That’s why they are called “opportunistic” infections. Others, like photodermatitis, may be linked to inflammation caused by an overactive immune system as it revives during antiretroviral drug therapy or due to the drugs themselves.

IT’S BETTER TO PREVENT A SUNBURN THAN TO TREAT ONE

A long-awaited arrival of summer means people tend to spend a lot of time outside when the weather is nice. So, an expert warns, it’s especially important at this time of year to take steps to protect your skin from the sun. Along with considerable pain and discomfort, sunburn can cause long-term harm to your skin.

JUVENILE DERMATOMYOSITIS

Juvenile dermatomyositis is one of the conditions in a group of conditions called the dermatomyositis/polymyositis complex. The conditions in this complex are characterized by muscle damage due to an inflammatory process of the blood vessels that lie under the skin and muscles. Skin changes around the eyelids and over the knuckles and finger joints are also seen. Juvenile dermatomyositis is the condition most often seen in children.

ROSACEA

Rosacea is a non-cancerous but chronic skin condition that often worsens in the winter. It is a common disorder characterized by redness on the nose, chin, cheeks, and forehead. People experiencing rosacea may also develop solid red bumps and pus-filled pimples, which can be painful. In some cases, the condition will cause the nose to swell, taking on a bulbous appearance called rhinophyma. While there is no cure for rosacea, certain treatments can help mitigate symptoms. Visiting a dermatologist is the best course of action for treatment.

KERATOSIS PILARIS

Keratosis pilaris is a common skin disorder characterized by small, pointed pimples. The pimples usually appear on the upper arms, thighs, and buttocks. The condition worsens in the winter and usually clears up in the summer. Keratosis pilaris has no known cause, but it tends to run in families. This disorder does not get worse over time. It is harmless, and often disappears as the person ages. Usually, no treatment is necessary for keratosis pilaris.

NONINFECTIOUS SKIN CONDITIONS

Many different noninfectious skin conditions require clinical care by a physician or other health care professional. Common conditions include dermatitis, acne, drug rashes, poison ivy/poison oak, rosacea, eczema, and psoriasis. While many of these can be treated at home with over-the-counter medication, visiting a dermatologist is the easiest way to get the treatments necessary.

SKIN SWEATING DISORDERS

Sweat glands under the skin produce sweat to help keep the body cool. Sweating increases with warmer temperatures, stress, or nervousness. Sweat consists of water, salt, and other chemicals produced and excreted from the body. Several sweating disorders require clinical care by a physician or other health care professional.