CHILDREN’S HEALTH

CAMPYLOBACTER INFECTION IN CHILDREN 

Campylobacter is a bacterium that can cause a mild to serious intestinal infection called campylobacteriosis. Symptoms often include cramping, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever. The campylobacter bacteria mostly affect infants, teenagers, and young adults. The CDC estimates that over 1.3 million cases of campylobacter occur in the U.S. each year. However, this is just an estimate because most of the cases go undiagnosed and unreported. 

CAT SCRATCH DISEASE IN CHILDREN 

Cat scratch disease is an illness that can occur after being bitten or scratched by a cat. It is caused when the Bartonella henselae bacteria carried by cats gets under the skin in a human. Cats, and especially kittens, become infected with the cat scratch bacteria from fleas. But fleas probably do not spread the bacteria to humans. Cats that are carrying the bacteria don’t get sick and don’t need to be treated. Cat scratch disease often goes away on its own in 2 to 4 months. 

CROUP 

Croup is a disease that causes swelling in the airways and problems breathing. Children with croup often have a high-pitched “creaking” or whistling sound when breathing in. This is called stridor. Croup is most commonly caused by a virus. It is sometimes, but rarely, caused by bacteria, allergies, or reflux from the stomach. Several viruses are known to cause croup, including Parainfluenza virus, Respiratory syncytial virus, (RSV) Influenza virus, and Adenovirus Enteroviruses. 

CHEMOTHERAPY FOR CHILDREN: SIDE EFFECTS 

Chemotherapy is one form of treatment for cancer, with some possible side effects that require clinical care by a doctor or other health care professional. There are some common side effects that children may experience more than adults. They include alopecia, mucositis, and bone marrow suppression.  

CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES 

There are many different types of chromosome abnormalities that require clinical care by a physician or other healthcare professional. Some include Down Syndrome, Turner Syndrome, and Edward’s syndrome.  

CHILDHOOD IMMUNIZATION INDEX 

Immunizations, also called vaccinations, are a set of shots given to infants and children at different ages to help keep them from developing dangerous childhood diseases. The diseases vaccinations protect against have serious complications and can even be fatal. Making sure your child receives immunizations when scheduled is the best way to help protect your child.  

CHICKENPOX 

Chickenpox is a highly infectious disease that usually occurs during childhood. By adulthood, more than 90% of Americans have had chickenpox. Since the mid-1990s, most children have been vaccinated against the infection. The disease is caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), a form of the herpes virus. Transmission occurs from person-to-person by direct contact or through the air by coughing or sneezing. 

CARDIOMYOPATHY AND YOUR CHILD 

Cardiomyopathy is disease of the heart muscle that reduces the heart’s ability to pump blood effectively. Different kinds of cardiomyopathy cause the heart muscle to enlarge, thicken, or become stiff. Cardiomyopathy can be due to a number of causes, including viral infections and certain medications. It can also be inherited. Often, the exact cause of the muscle disease is never found. Cardiomyopathy can lead to irregular heart rhythms or heart failure. 

DELAYED PUBERTY 

Puberty is said to be delayed when physical signs do not appear by age 13 for girls or age 14 for boys. Delayed puberty may run in families. However, delayed puberty may also be due to chromosomal abnormalities, genetic disorders, chronic illnesses, or tumors that damage the pituitary gland or the hypothalamus in the brain, which make hormones that regulate sexual maturation.