CARDIAC AND CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE PREVENTION 

 It is possible to reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease by eliminating the risk factors you can control and managing the risk factors you cannot control. Making the appropriate lifestyle changes can help to lower your risk of cardiovascular disease. This includes not smoking, developing a healthier diet, calculating calories, and understanding and remaining aware of cholesterol intake.  

CARDIAC DIAGNOSTIC TESTS 

New and advanced diagnostic tests and tools are constantly being introduced to further our understanding of the complexity of disease, injury, and congenital (present at birth) or acquired abnormalities. The following are just a few of the diagnostic tests that have been used or are being used to further understand and identify cardiovascular disease: ECG, Cardiac Stress Test, Chest Radiography, CT Scan, Cardiac Monitoring. For more specific information, consult your cardiologist or other health care provider. 

CARDIAC REHABILITATION 

What is cardiac rehabilitation? It is a doctor-supervised program for people who have most kinds of heart disease. Program participants may or may not have had a heart attack or heart surgery (or other heart procedures). Cardiac rehabilitation can often improve functional capacity, reduce symptoms, and create a sense of well-being for patients. What conditions may benefit from cardiac rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation program is designed to meet the needs of most cardiac patients. Talk to your doctor to find a rehabilitation program that works for you.  

CLINICAL GUIDELINES FOR HEART FAILURE 

 To receive the best care for heart failure, talking frankly with your health care team is a good place to start. It’s also helpful to know about a resource published by health experts that outlines treatment plans recommended for patients with chronic heart failure. Since 1980, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association have jointly published clinical guidelines to help health care providers create good care plans for their patients. The guidelines change frequently, so ensure that your healthcare provider is working from the most recent list.  

CARDIAC CATHETERIZATION 

 Cardiac catheterization is performed to further evaluate coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, and/or certain congenital (present at birth) heart conditions, such as atrial septal defect or ventricular septal defect, when other less invasive types of diagnostic tests indicate the presence of one of these conditions. 

CORONARY ARTERY BYPASS GRAFT SURGERY (CABG) 

Coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) is a procedure used to treat coronary artery disease in certain circumstances. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the narrowing of the coronary arteries (the blood vessels that supply oxygen and nutrients to the heart muscle), caused by a buildup of fatty material within the walls of the arteries. This buildup causes strain on the arteries, which can lead to a variety of complications.  

CAROTID ARTERY DUPLEX SCAN 

A carotid artery duplex scan is a type of vascular ultrasound study done to assess the blood flow of the arteries that supply blood from the heart through the neck to the brain. There are 2 carotid arteries, each of which divides into 2 more: the right internal and external carotid arteries and the left internal and external carotid arteries. 

COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY (CT OR CAT) SCAN OF THE CHEST 

Computed tomography (CT or CAT scan) is a noninvasive diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce horizontal, or axial, images (often called slices) of the body. A CT scan shows detailed images of any part of the body, including the bones, muscles, fat, and organs. CT scans are more detailed than standard X-rays. This is often used to assess cardiac health.  

COARCTATION OF THE AORTA 

Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital (present at birth) heart defect involving a narrowing of the aorta. The aorta is the large artery that carries oxygen-rich (red) blood from the left ventricle to the body. It is shaped like a candy cane. The first section moves up towards the head (ascending aorta), then curves in a C-shape as smaller arteries that are attached to it carry blood to the head and arms (aortic arch).